Yes, you can snack before bedtime! You just gotta know what to eat and how much…

The ‘rule’ seems to be this: eat dinner early (ideally by 7 pm) and hit the sack five hours later. While this is not a bad idea, snacking before bed should not be seen as something that’s just plain bad because there are ways to go about it. If it has been a few hours after dinner, you could consider a snack. A light snack makes sense because if you sleep hungry, your sleep may not be perfect.

Oatmeal works for breakfast and even works before bed.
Oatmeal works for breakfast and even works before bed.

Anything that is high on fat or grease is bad for you anyway, and pretty bad before bed. You need to eat a snack that will boost your metabolism. Likewise, salty stuff, spicy and acidic snacks  (like pickles, tomato sauce, oranges, etc.) may cause heartburn. And lay off that ice-cream tub because it will up your sugar levels and you may end up feeling a little too alert.

The traditional food before bedtime, like a glass of warm milk, actually work. Most warm liquids will make you sleepy as it will increase your body temperature. Add to that the fact that milk contains tryptophan and calcium, makes it one of the best ‘snack’ before bed. Continue reading Yes, you can snack before bedtime! You just gotta know what to eat and how much…

Desk exercises that are great return on investment for your body

image courtesy: womenlivingwell.org
image courtesy: womenlivingwell.org

Eight or ten hours in the office and most of us are looking for the most comfortable place to sink in. All the mind work, some of it tedious, does a lot of us in. And many of us use that one drink to feel better (and smokers do even worse), which then turns into another drink. In short, that is office life for you.

However, it does not have to be that way. First of all, you can definitely feel much more sprightly with a little smarter use of your body while at the desk. And the other thing is, it keeps you from going fat. Anyone will tell you that they put on those extra pounds because they sat on the desk and worked to make money for a ‘better’ life. Yes, it is ironic.

While at your office desk, you can actually exercise without really disrupting your work. And this will mean you don’t have to do that extra half hour at the gym (provided you are the kind that actually goes to the gym post work).

Do these (desk) workouts and get great return on investment! Continue reading Desk exercises that are great return on investment for your body

Body of Emotions

We know that emotions are connected to physiological changes in our bodies. But have you ever wondered how your body feels the emotions we constantly experience? What if you can map each emotion you feel on your body? Here’s a look.
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Just in case you thought that emotions were only felt in an unknown, intangible realm, you’re mistaken. A new research carried out by the Aalto University in Finland showed that our bodies feel the sensations of emotions regardless of our culture, nationality, language and religion. This is because the whole mind-body connection is biological and linked to our very drive for survival.

So when the last time your partner kissed you “good morning” and gave you a loving look, where is it that you actually felt the ‘I’m in love’ emotion? Whether it is butterflies in stomach (anxiety) or the puffin up of the chest (pride), these emotions are universally associated with certain bodily sensations. Based on where these emotions are felt inside our bodies, Finnish researchers mapped the emotions that the body went through. Continue reading Body of Emotions

Back up your spine

Image Courtesy: freeguidetips.com
Image Courtesy: freeguidetips.com

While sitting slows down your metabolism, it also puts a lot of pressure on the lower back. That is why computers and back pain go together. You have to take care because spine health determines your continued success. If you are hurting already, read this and implement it:

Keep your head up: Align head and neck above your shoulders.

Keep the mouse close: No reaching for it. It should be close on a comfy mousepad next to your keyboard.

Get the right chair: It must let your lower back rest on a lumbar support.

Breathe from your stomach: Inhale like you want to get your navel close to your spine.

Sit close: Your torso should be about an arm’s length away from the monitor. Monitor should be 2 to 3 inches above the eye level.

Rest your feet: Plant them flat on the floor, comfortably apart.

Take breaks: Move, stretch every 45 minutes to an hour.

Right angle: Position knees at 90 degrees above your ankles. It keeps the spine straight.

Stretch shoulders: Roll them back and down, square them over your hips, as if you’re balancing a plate on your head.

Stop squinting & straining: Laptop users tend to do this. Get a separate keyboard and a mouse.

Uncross legs: Crossing legs while sitting makes it difficult to keep the spine straight.

Mobile use: If you are the kind that cradles your phone with your neck while talking, your spine is under stress. Stop it. Take a walk, keep conversations short (5 minutes is good).