“A substance can cure what it can induce”

Dr. Nikhil Patil, an acclaimed homoeopath, talks about homoeopathy and busts the age-old myths…
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Dr. Nikhil Patil, BHMS, Clinical Research in Homoeopathy
Dr. Nikhil Patil, BHMS, Clinical Research in Homoeopathy

Being a homoeopathic doctor, do you face a lot of criticism in the world of allopathics? What kind of criticism? And how do you deal with it?

Homoeopathy is a well-proven science, and is practiced at large worldwide. Every law has exceptions and similarly, every system of medicine has some flaws. Yes! There is criticism and I feel it is healthy criticism. It helps me grow and become a better doctor every day. There are patients who come with hesitation and ask me questions about authenticity of homoeopathy, its curative powers and mostly about the time taken to cure diseases. With advancement in technology and practicing methods, the time to cure diseases has reduced up to certain hours. In acute conditions like asthmatic attacks, homoeopathic treatment can reduce patient’s sufferings in minutes.

The criticism is mostly about time taken to cure diseases and with adapting to certain methods of treatment I am able to deal with that criticism by showing results. I feel dealing with criticism has to be this way only. Finding each other’s faults is not going to reduce the suffering of the person; instead of reacting to such things I spend my time in improving my methods and reducing the suffering of the patient. Around 2-3 years back, there was lot of discussion going on about the “Placebo Effect” of homoeopathy and I guess everybody has come out of it. With the help of modern technology, scientists have proven that there is no such thing as “Placebo Effect” in homoeopathy, and actually homoeopathy works on nano-technology. Continue reading “A substance can cure what it can induce”

An open letter to Arvind Kejriwal on aam aadmi’s health

By Santanu B
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Arvind Kejriwal (Image Courtesy - indiatoday.intoday.in)
Arvind Kejriwal
(Image Courtesy – indiatoday.intoday.in)

Dear Arvind Kejriwal:

Now that you are going to be the chief minister of Delhi (with Congress support, of course), we at Savetime have a few concerns and requests for the Aam Aadmi Party. To begin with, you deserve a round of applause for taking on the money machine politics of Delhi and showing them that people are not stupid. Now a word of caution: please do not degenerate into an aam party. With the Congress behind you that is a possibility. Of course, we understand that in politics there are compulsions and, in order to change things, it is better to be in power. We do not know how quickly or effectively the system can be changed, but we cannot be sure until somebody gets a fighting chance. So, while we look to a brighter future (what’s the new year for, anyway?), we know that we have to tread lightly because the fact is, your party is yet to be put to the governance test. While people’s revolutions work well, the brains behind it may or may not make great administrators. Look what happened to Assam. After the Assam Accord was signed by Rajeev Gandhi and the revolutionary students’ body, AASU, took the reins of governance as the AGP, it screwed up the state’s future because the leaders could not handle the power (and the dough that comes along) humbly and sensibly – a very common story. Continue reading An open letter to Arvind Kejriwal on aam aadmi’s health

Healthcare and Technology

In the year 2010, 21-year-old Ravindra Mokashi, a resident of Vada village in Thane district, was stricken by an almost debilitating pain around his mouth and throat. Ultimately, swelling in the area combined with an inability to swallow even a morsel of food, forced Mokashi to make the long trek to the Thane District Hospital in Thane city. But doctors there were unable to identify what appeared to be a growth near his throat.

It was then that they consulted specialists at KEM Hospital Pune with the help of a telemedicine centre that had been set up at both healthcare centres less than two years ago. Doctors in Mumbai, after studying Mokashi’s case, diagnosed him with a rare condition, schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve, a benign tumour. “We didn’t know if the mass was a normal occurrence or not. So we consulted doctors at KEM. The verdict was that the benign growth had to be operated on immediately,’’ said Dr V Kalwanda, Thane District Hospital. Mokashi underwent surgery on February 15, where doctors removed an almost four-cm-long mass of tumour.

Source: Times of India

This is just one of the case where telemedicine has helped a patient. In Pune since the start of telemedicine in KEM hospital, rural Maharashtra has benefited from it in several ways. Such stories can now be found in other states such as Rajasthan, Assam, Bihar and all over India.

Telemedicine now makes a mockery of distance and provides a timely and expert doctor care to the people residing in the remote parts of the country.

Our healthcare system even helps out several African countries with telemedicine. In a closely monitored project by our previous President APJ Abdul Kalam, India helped connect several remote areas in African countries and provided the people there with much needed healthcare at affordable rates. In addition the ill-equipped and under staffed hospitals of such African countries can now discuss medical cases and even perform critical operations under the supervision of expert medical counterparts sitting in India.

Technology has advanced in order to deliver healthcare in more ways than one. Now people are no longer stuck up with what their doctor tells them.

The first thing an internet-savvy youth does when he is facing some form of physical pain or discomfort is put the symptoms on a search engine to find out what is ailing him. Information exchange has become so easy that medical reports of an Indian patient are sent to specialist sitting in U.S. or Europe to get a second opinion.

Patients today are not satisfied by just simply following what their doctors tell them. They seek second opinion, they search for possible causes, they investigate medicines and their side effects that a doctor may have suggested. Patients also pose different question to their doctors about their medical condition and treatment they’re undergoing. Ease of access to information has empowered them to take informed decisions and presented them with more suitable choices.

Alternative medicines are getting lot of focus with the advent of technology in healthcare industry. This has kept the medical fraternity also on their toes, to diagnose better, to suggest better options that include non-invasive and other safer methods.

Websites with information on medicine and alternative medicine have mushroomed in past few years. Mobile apps can help you track your medicine schedule, can keep a track of your vitals, medical reports and much more.

At the minimum every nook and corner of the country is equipped with a phone, every other person in the country now carries a mobile. Even this piece of technology has made remarkable strides in providing and receiving healthcare. With this easy mode of communication, patients interact with their friends and relatives at different places to get more information about the cures to their ailments or specialists available in different parts of the country.

20 years back this was not the case, a patient was at the mercy of doctor and his treatment and in some ways this is still the case. Technology has changed this picture for the better and continues to do so. In the years to come it will help each and every Indian receive better medical care at affordable rates.

Savetime.com is also another small step in this direction.

AbhinavAbhinav is CTO at savetime.com. Besides the work he likes to be involved in several different exciting things.  Technology interests him but more than that the usage of technology to solve real world problems excites him more.  Working with teams to achieve difficult targets and in the process helping individuals realize their full potential is one of  his skills. He is an ardent blogger and social media enthusiast. When not working, he is either blogging, reading or bicycling.