NASSCOM chooses Savetime among top 5 companies of Pune

On March 5, Savetime saw yet another proud moment when NASSCOM declared the top five emerging companies of Pune at its event, ‘NASSCOM Product Conclave’ held at Hotel Westin in Pune. The event, largely attended by Pune-based companies, had a panel of jury comprising successful entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, representatives from NASSCOM, TiE and large corporate houses.

The participating companies were asked to do a presentation for the jury. The pitches, meant for the jury, went all day long till 4:00 p.m. The jury finally declared the top five companies at 5:00 p.m for showcasing at the main stage. Product-centric innovation and real solutions for pain-points were among the top criteria in choosing these companies. Apart from Savetime Technologies, the other companies chosen were:

A)    Ascent Informatics: SaaS service for monitoring industrial devices in real time.

B)    kPoint Tech: Cloud-based video creation and sharing platform.

C)    Qualitia: Selenium-based test automation platform that doesn’t require scripts.

D)    ANTfarm Robotics: Product that helps consumers control their electrical appliances at home using their mobile phones.

Savetime has over 4,300 doctors in Pune listed on its platform. The platform provides accurate and comprehensive information collected directly from the doctors and genuine patient reviews collected directly from real patients. This makes Savetime a decision-enabling platform which offers more value than a plain directory. After the jury declared the result, this writer spoke to Mitesh Bohra, co-founder and CEO, Savetime. He said, “Savetime is extremely beneficial for folks who do not know where to go when they have a medical need. We help you find the right doctor in your area within your budget. You don’t even have to know the medical jargon. Just talk to our system like you are talking to a friend. Tell us your symptoms and we will suggest the right specialist.”

Mitesh Bohra, founder and CEO, Savetime Technologies making a presentation about how Savetime works
Mitesh Bohra, co-founder and CEO, Savetime Technologies making a presentation on how Savetime works

Friends with Benefits

Friends are an important entity in our lives. The only people with whom you can share and say almost anything you want and feel without giving second thoughts.

We have different friends who fit in different categories like  a friend  you can call any time of the day/night, a friend who is always ready for an outing, a friend who has the same taste in movies/books, a friend you don’t fancy for no apparent reason but still tolerate and the list goes on. But as the jingle goes ‘har ek friend zaroori hota hai

Sometimes when friends do something it gets us in trouble. Seldom has it happened that you benefit with free gifts and coupons courtesy your friends – unless it’s your birthday (which will also burn a hole in your pocket with the never-ending demands for a treat!).

But now your friends can help you WIN! Yes, you can now earn Gift Vouchers for something your friend does for you and they benefit from it too.

Savetime now give you this opportunity where you can win Gift Vouchers when your friends registers with us through your reference. All you have to do is invite them to Savetime and ask them to register with us.

And that’s it! Seriously.

The process is as simple as 1-2-3

1: Invite your friends to Savetime through Facebook, twitter or email. Or you can just ask them to register on Savetime.com and mention your registered mobile number in the “referral code” field while registering.

2. Your friends register on www.savetime.com

3: You get a Gift Voucher from us and your friends get introduced to the largest database of doctors in Pune which can help them find the right doctor whenever in need and they also become part of the Biggest and Vibrant Patient Community!

So get going, spread the word and win as many vouchers as you can. Log on to www.savetime.com now.

Why should we write doctor recommendations?

During my conversations about Savetime with my family, relatives or friends following few questions often come up. “Why should I write a recommendation?”, “What will change by writing recommendation?”, “The visit to the doctor was just normal what is there to write about?”

However on the contrary, we tend to believe what people say and want to get feedback from them first, rather than trying something new on our own. Especially when it comes to medical issues we are even more cautious. For example while visiting a doctor, we usually go to a doctor because a friend of mine said he is good doctor or my uncle told me about his good reputation. Our mind is relatively at ease while visiting a doctor through a reference of an uncle, a relative, a friend or even a stranger. So doctor recommendations are very important for all of us.

In below points I deal with the “Why” part. We all should write doctor recommendations and here are a few reasons:

1)      Recommendations builds trust

In a city like Pune, we have many migrants for education and business. Many a times we have the need of a doctor and we want to find the ‘good doctor’ or the most trusted doctor. At such time when you are new to a City and have no one to consult too, the experiences shared by other people play a very important role in choosing the right doctor and it builds trust between the doctor and the patient even before the patient walks in the clinic.

2)    We learn more about our regular doctors

As mostly our first appointment with a doctor is a result of some known or unknown experience and maybe for a different ailment; recommendations by others provide us a good way to know about the doctor we have already been going to. We might not know about other specialties of that doctor and other procedure that the doctor undertakes. Other people can help us understand our regular doctors better.

3)    We get to know about new doctors

There is a very good saying “A bad remedy for a disease is far worse than the disease

You might be a local or a migrant in a City like Pune and need to visit a specialist that your family physician suggested you. In this technologically advanced age you do not need to get stuck with one doctor or the referred doctor. You can find other similar specialists in your area and can read through recommendation of other fellow patients. You might end up going to a new doctor after going through those recommendations and might get well sooner and have to spend less.

4)    Brings Doctor and Patient closer

Doctors generally like to maintain good contacts with their patients as they also learn from our recovery cycle. One of the way to maintain the contacts is replying to patients’ views. Sometimes they explain why a medicine was prescribed and sometimes it’s a simple expression of gratitude from them. This helps to build  a social bonding with doctor. Such bonding is always useful while getting a good advice, consultations at odd time or discounts on treatments.

5)    Helps building the patient community

Giving back to the community is an obligation that we must fulfill. There are times when you are looking for a good pediatrician in town for your kid’s vaccination, other time you were looking for an orthopedist nearby for your old parents who can’t travel long distance. At such times community helped you in choosing the right doctor. As a goodwill gesture we should also contribute to the community. Our experience with the doctors might be helpful for fellow parents who are equally scared in taking their 2 year old kid to a new doctor, it might save someone from an unprofessional doctor or might help in many other ways. This builds a patient community where patients are well informed to take the right decision and this could foster a very good relationship between patients and doctors.

savetime doctor recommendation

So don’t delay any further log onto www.savetime.com and share your experiences with all the doctors you have been to and read from the thousands of review already shared by the patient community. And if you still have any other questions, feel free to leave a comment.

Swapnil Potdar, savetime.com.Swapnil is self-motivated and loves challenges. He is always eager to keep track of technology trends in the world. He likes to asks tons of questions, enjoys meeting new people and learning new things. He is currently working with our Android team. He is an Engineering graduate in IT from MIT, Pune. Savetime.com is the beginning of his passionate journey to make a difference in the world. Facebook, board puzzles and sci-fi thriller books take up rest of his time.

The Family Physician – An Idea Lost to Time?

At our healthcare innovation enthusiasts meetup this weekend we followed up with an important question for all our attendees. What do you do when you just need simple medical advice? One of our attendees who migrated to Pune only recently surprised us by sharing that he calls his family physician back in his home town Satara. That feedback connected together a series of discussions that we’ve been having here around our direction for Savetime.

Many of us don’t have the equivalent of a family physician. It isn’t that we’re invincible, I guess we simply never made the time. Instead, whenever needed we rely on recommendations from parents, friends, especially those who we think know the city better than we do. While their recommendations work well there’s something missing from the larger picture.

Any diagnosis is founded on at least three key factors – your symptoms, medical history and the prevalent medical environment at that time. We’re all accustomed to asking and answering questions about our physiology so that we can get better treatment. A series of questions can help uncover everything from the smallest to the largest of ailments. That’s how primary care works. We rely on this approach as it would be expensive and even undesirable to prescribe all possible tests for every observed symptom.

What sets apart the family physician is the combination of in-depth knowledge of your medical constitution and training across specialties. In many cases, she is aware of the patients medical make up since birth. When a treatment is ineffective, or a diagnosis incomplete or incorrect, she serves as a key part of the puzzle in prescribing the relevant tests, referring you to the right specialist, or coming up with a new line of questions. Even in the case when you don’t have an ailment, as our meetup attendee pointed out, the family physician is there  to answer any questions too trivial for a visit to the clinic.

Recording medical histories digitally can’t fill in the gap left by a family physician entirely. Think of your medical history as if it were a globe. Medical histories depict what the land masses are like. But we still have no clue about the oceans. In other words. What are you like when you’re well? Or, when you’re not seeking medical care? Do you have any conditions that might be mistaken for the symptom of an ailment? Or worse. Do you have a condition that does not have any visible or verifiable symptoms? How does your physiology change throughout your day? Until we figure out how to track and store what easily runs into terabytes of information, the best alternative is always going to be human intuition and a checklist of questions that can help confirm or invalidate the physicians hypothesis.

In popular culture, the television show “House” is a recognizable parallel to this role. The brilliant eccentric Dr. House is the head of diagnostics at a prominent hospital. In order to be on his team (a much sought after position as the show would like us to believe), House requires his doctors to be ok with breaking into the patient’s house to search for clues. As House says, patients Lie about their histories more often than you’d expect, even if they’re dying. While the show is a work of fiction, the practices shown in the show are not entirely so even if they’ve been amplified for dramatic effect. Moreover, House is literally the ‘Sherlock Holmes’ of diagnostics and is presented with incredibly hard medical cases to solve. To have any credibility, coincidence or luck can hardly be convenient crutches for the story writer.

I’m not sure why the family physician isn’t as popular as it has been in the past. Perhaps a busy migratory life discourages the effort that cements this valuable one on one relationship. At this point, a few questions beg to be asked. What if we could reinvent that relationship? Take it with us wherever we go? What if she were accessible 24×7 over phone, sms or email? What if she had the best in class tools and technology to track our physiology? Wouldn’t that be a different, better world?

Santosh Dawara, User Growth at savetime

Santosh drives user growth at savetime and is a tech-entrepreneur. He enjoys creating products that help users think, create and achieve amazing things with the web. An industry veteran, he’s played roles with BlackBerry smartphone makers, Research in Motion and has taken India’s first online movie tickets aggregator live.

Do we care enough?

As an employee at a major multinational in the United States, I remember my first visit to the doctor’s office. I had woken up to a sore throat and visited the doctor the same day. The doctor checked my breathing, took a throat swab, prescribed an antibiotic and sent me on my way. I thought nothing of the visit until I checked the bill to my insurance provider. Imagine my surprise when I saw that my provider would be paying $110 not including the cost of my medicines, or a little more than Rs. 5,800. It left me with an incredibly unsettled feeling and many questions. Nine years after that visit, today a routine primary care checkup in the US costs $176.

As an Indian, I appreciate that a visit to a doctor here in any city costs anywhere between Rs. 50 to Rs. 500 ($10). Incredibly, the quality of primary care we deliver is still the same. I’m also willing to bet that a significant portion of those dollars paid went towards an unnecessary but mandatory test of my throat swab and indemnification of the doctor against the remote chance of me initiating a lawsuit. Such is an environment where fear of legal retribution commands a premium from exactly the same people who it was supposed to protect in the first place.

Which is why it’s a little disturbing to spot a new trend here in India where we irresponsibly name and shame our doctors. Social media and other forms of participative media encourage patients to share their experiences with doctors. Unfortunately, popular review sites are also breeding grounds for negativity where the posters share only their negative experiences.

Mainstream media too plays a significant role in attempting to shame doctors and their profession. I recall an episode of Satyamev Jayate where host Aamir Khan interviewed a family who had lost a dear one to alleged medical malpractice. What was sad was that the Star TV team did not make an effort to ask the doctor at the center of the accusation for his version of what had happened. This isn’t an isolated incident.

Of course, we shouldn’t excuse our doctor’s for their mistakes. Instead, I ask but a simple question- why shouldn’t we investigate and represent facts for what they are before embarking on a public campaign that could destroy a career? My argument is not meant to protect doctors who intend to harm, but for the doctors who had only the best of intentions and have made a mistake. If we judge going only by the outcome, then many of our doctors are guilty for simply practicing their profession. Such is the nature of what they’ve been asked to do.

I’ve known doctor’s to get attached to some of their patients even when it could mean going against what they’ve been taught. The patient could be a newborn, or someone suffering from a terminal disease. Similarly, when all other avenues are hopeless patients can only place their faith in their doctor. Through the eyes of the patient, the doctor truly must play the role of God. How can we expect them to be perfect? In fact, I can imagine that many doctors have a personal ‘near miss’ story where they compromised the well-being of their patient, but a colleague or simply good fortune intervened and the error was found out before it was too late. No one can be expected to humanly perform at the highest levels. Software engineers write bugs, doctors make errors and even voters occasionally regret their choices in leaders. People do fail, and when we do we reflect on our mistakes and feel terrible about them- thankfully.

Here at Savetime, we realize this fact full well. Patients have come to expect our doctors to have the cure, so much so that a job well done is now ordinary. We don’t agree. To fulfill our vision of creating India’s largest platform to bring doctors and patients together – we’re creating tools that will help you share both types of stories- the ones that will give you goosebumps, as well as those stories which you won’t get to hear. Tools that will hopefully help patients relate their experiences carefully. We won’t pretend that we don’t have a role to play. We believe the impact of our work will be felt in raising the overall intelligence of the patient community, better protection against malpractice and most importantly our confidence in the part of the healthcare system that is working well.

We wish all our doctors on Savetime the best for doctor’s day.

Santosh Dawara, User Growth at savetime

Santosh drives user growth at savetime and is a tech-entrepreneur. He enjoys creating products that help users think, create and achieve amazing things with the web. An industry veteran, he’s played roles with BlackBerry smartphone makers, Research in Motion and has taken India’s first online movie tickets aggregator live.